1886 Hillman, Herbert & Cooper ‘Premier’ Cross frame Safety

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6 FEBRUARY, 1886: PATENT ILLUSTRATION

for Hillman, Herbert & Cooper’s new Cross frame Safety Bicycle

1886 Hillman, Herbert & Cooper

‘Premier’ Cross frame Safety, 2nd Pattern

The ‘Mudguard Frame design, which was patented June, 1886

28″ Wheels

My latest acquisition is this 1886 Premier cross frame, seeing the light again after a long time in storage.

Its 28″ wheelset appears to have been on it for a long time, but it should have 30″ wheels. Its bolt-on rear step is missing, and the chainwheel needs moving over to the left side (the bottom bracket appears to allow the chainwheel to be mounted on either side).

It lacks any chain adjustment, which suggests the first year of Premier cross frame manufacture. Its rear mudguard forms part of the frame so it’s not the first pattern of the Premier cross frame safety (whose design was similar to the patent drawing). I assume it’s the second development in Premier cross frame design. Roger Armstrong, the marque specialist, describes this design as a ‘Mudguard Frame’. I’ll add more details after I’ve researched it further.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1886 CHAINWHEEL PATENT ILLUSTRATION

1886/1887 PREMIER MILITARY MODEL

TO SEE THE

1886/87 PREMIER MILITARY MODEL

PLEASE CLICK HERE

THE SHELTER HALL

PHOTO LOCATION: Concorde 2 Club, Madeira Drive, Brighton. Its building was originally the ‘Shelter Hall’ for the cliff lift –

1890 Under the Brighton Improvement Act of 1884, Madeira Terrace [sheltered walk or ‘Colonnade’ and ‘Max’s Walk’], Madeira lift and shelter hall [now Concorde 2] were built. Terrace designed by borough surveyor Phillip Causton Lockwood, who also designed the Brighton (Birdcage) Bandstand, built in 1884. The shelter hall was designed as a cafe and waiting room.
…each bay of the entirely cast-iron arcade has an identical elevation: round arches carried on single columns of a fanciful marine order; scalloped-arch intrados; spandrels formed by concentric rings of quatrefoils, forming a pierced sun screen; keystone cast to resemble either a female or a bearded male deity, perhaps Venus and Neptune.” (From English Heritage listing)
The terraces were also designed with a gap to allow the Japanese spindle plants to continue their climb up the cliff face. Seating was designed on the upper terrace, to sit proud of the ‘green wall’. The shelter hall lift was originally powered by water pressure, with the current electro-mechanical lifting mechanism fitted in 1930. The western terrace was added later.
[https://building-green.org.uk/2015/09/08/timeline-madeira-drive-through-history]